23 Oct 2014

BRLDWELL-JUXTL-OOGGESHLLL.

Ludovicus Bromley. Admon. Sep. 19, 1609 (v.0. 790). Relict, Mary.

Edw. Maxey. As to Probate, Oct. 2, 1621, vide v.0. 215b,

Edm. Normanton. Probate, Feb. 20, 1638-9 (v.0. 515). Sir William Maxey, Knt., executor.

Isaac Smythies, M.A., admitted to Rectory, Mag 11, 1654. Patron: John Spencer esq., and dame Helen, his wife, late wife of ir William Marney, Kat, (Lambefl; MS. 997, I., 53). Vide also Bromley Parva and Dagenham.

Henry the 7th interest Lancaster or York?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Lancaster

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_York

Richard was Lancaster?

Henry the 7th York and father of Henry the 8th

From Cressing the party went to Bradwell Church and Hall. The fabric of the church is Norman, with 14th century windows inserted, and has a timber porch of the 15th century. There are the remains of a well-carved roodscreen temp. Hen. VII., and upon the floor a fragment of an incised slab representing a priest in eucharistic vestments with the date 1349. This kind of monument is of but rare occurrence in Essex. Bradwell Hall which was kindly opened to the inspection of the Meeting by H. T. Brunwin, Esq., is an interesting structure formerly the residence of the Maxeyfamily and appears to have been built by Anthony Maxey in the reign of Elizabeth, his arms and those of Dorothy (Basset) his wife being over the fireplace of the wainscoted parlour, and their initials occurring on the coved ceiling of the gallery which is divided into geometrical patterns and enriched with flowers and foliage. His death took place in 1592. Here Mr. C. F. Hayward briefly described the architectural character of the house. Proceeding thence to Rivenhall Church, Mr. Hamilton described, and offered some remarks upon the remains of ancient painted glass preserved there, much of which is of early and very fine character; the particulars will be embodied in his future paper. It was purchased by the Rector, the Rev. B. D. Hawkins, from the authorities of a French village, who had determined to replace it by modern glass, on account of the designs being imperfect and for some other reasons. On the return to Witham the small Norman church of Little Braxted and adjacent manor house were visited, and the Meeting, which was well attended, terminated.

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17 Sep 2014
View RecordMargaret MaxMarriage31 Jan 1621Chilthorne DormerHenryView RecordJoan MaxChristening(Baptism)1 Nov 1629High HamAnnView RecordJohn MaxeMarriage26 Nov 1622High HamEleanorView RecordElizabeth MaxeBurial6 May 1624High Ham
13 Aug 2014
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1239-1307
Henry the 111 abnd Edward 1
with translation
Rotuli Hundredorum, temp. Henr. III. & Edw. I.: in turr. Lond. et …, Volume 1
Hundreds roll, temp. Henry. 3. And Edw. 1 .: on the tower. London. and …, Volume1
diélus lat in pat 1 _ _ Iîm Radulphus de Makefeye ballivus de Neffe cepit xx fol de q d Willo de fVelledone fllbilio 8 de Hugone Punchet де Carleby qui fuëant cü felonibg qui interfecerîit Petrü dc Carleby 8 р011са 111 gduëtu ballivi ejsd redìerüt de STANFGRDIA apd Ci iiLs11r ut celare 9fenê óm 11111610 8 ut eos nö ithachiaret vij aim elaps 8 ad hue pdiëli süt in palla lfm Wills de Burton ballivus de Neffe cepit xiiij fol де q d Galfrid Piilore de Langetoft 9111610 де q d juŕïito ix fol jicio furtive cupto q min ей atachiaret 8 feloniä fuä celar hoc anno
Diel lat the pat _ 1 _ Jim Ralph Makefeye bailiff Neff took twenty folio of utmost Willem de fVelledone fllbilio 8 Hugh Punchet де Carleby that fuëant Cu felonibg that killed Peter dc Carleby 8 р011са 111 gduëtu bailiffs ejsd redìerüt of STANFGRDIA Apd Ci iiLs11r 9fenê to conceal them evan 11111610 8 to No. ithachiaret seven unified elaps 8 to exist in this pdiëli canvas lfm Wills of Burton bailiff Neff took fourteen fol де means Geoffrey Piilore of Langtoft 9111610 де means juŕïito nine fol adjunct stealth cupto q min ей atachiaret 8 Put a felony to conceal this year
continued information pertaining the Reign of Edward the 1

Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England from 1272 to 1307. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved early in the political intrigues of his father’s reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford. After reconciliation with his father, however, he remained loyal throughout the subsequent armed conflict, known as the Second Barons’ War. After the Battle of Lewes, Edward was hostage to the rebellious barons, but escaped after a few months and joined the fight against Simon de Montfort. Montfort was defeated at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, and within two years the rebellion was extinguished. With England pacified, Edward left on acrusade to the Holy Land. The crusade accomplished little, and Edward was on his way home in 1272 when he was informed that his father had died. Making a slow return, he reached England in 1274 and was crowned at Westminster on 19 August.

He spent much of his reign reforming royal administration and common law. Through an extensive legal inquiry, Edward investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series ofstatutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward’s attention was drawn towards military affairs. After suppressing a minor rebellion in Wales in 1276–77, Edward responded to a second rebellion in 1282–83 with a full-scale war of conquest. After a successful campaign, Edward subjected Wales to English rule, built a series of castles and towns in the countryside and settled them with Englishmen. Next, his efforts were directed towards Scotland. Initially invited to arbitrate a succession dispute, Edward claimed feudal suzerainty over the kingdom. In the war that followed, the Scots persevered, even though the English seemed victorious at several points. At the same time there were problems at home. In the mid-1290s, extensive military campaigns required high levels of taxation, and Edward met with both lay and ecclesiastical opposition. These crises were initially averted, but issues remained unsettled. When the King died in 1307, he left to his son, Edward II, an ongoing war with Scotland and many financial and political problems.

Edward I was a tall man for his era, hence the nickname “Longshanks”. He was temperamental, and this, along with his height, made him an intimidating man, and he often instilled fear in his contemporaries. Nevertheless, he held the respect of his subjects for the way he embodied the medieval ideal of kingship, as a soldier, an administrator and a man of faith. Modern historians are divided on their assessment of the King: while some have praised him for his contribution to the law and administration, others have criticised him for his uncompromising attitude towards his nobility. Currently, Edward I is credited with many accomplishments during his reign, including restoring royal authority after the reign of Henry III, establishing Parliament as a permanent institution and thereby also a functional system for raising taxes, and reforming the law through statutes. At the same time, he is also often criticised for other actions, such as his brutal conduct towards the Scots, and issuing the Edict of Expulsion in 1290, by which the Jews were expelled from England. The Edict remained in effect for the rest of the Middle Ages, and it would be over 350 years until it was formally overturned under Oliver Cromwell in 1656.

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1355

Rotuli Hundredorum, temp. Henr. III. & Edw. I.: in turr. Lond. et …, Volume 1

Robertus Vicarius de Makefeye, ér Ricardus de Ardent, cum Duo-
bus Equis.

Robert vicar of Makefeye, Richard dalize the burn, with two-
the horses.

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 Calendarium inquisitionum post mortem
Calendar of research after death
 Makefeye Stephanus, armiger, 462.
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1291
4 6 3 Eccìia де Makefeye ­ _

Taxatio ecclesiastica Angliae et Walliae, auctoritate P. Nicholai …, Part 1291

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1300
* written. In witness whereof, I have put to my seal. Given at 4 Burg, on Easter eve, 1300. In presence of the lord abbat, the ma4 sters Thomasde Freston, & Geossry dc Makeseye, John de Undele, 4 Robert de Thorpe, Bernard de Castre, & Richard the clerc’ Besides those persons here named, Sir Hugh Wake & Sir Robert de Bavent (tho’ their names are omitted above) were present at sealing of the said letter of submission. The said master Hugh being thus tied down & obliged to performance of every article, the abbat then decreed, I. That he should keep up all the rights & liberties of the house. II. That all the income, whether revenues belonging to the house, or offerings given to it, should be divided into three parrs. One for a chantry priest to celebrate in the chapel, & do all other priestly offices necessary for the sick & poor strangers; & to buy lights, vestments, & other ornaments. Which office of the chantry priest the abbat enjoyned the said master Hugh to perform himself. Another
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1255-1300

* On 12 March, 1251—2, the Minister of the Friars Minors was commanded to send

the King a sufficient number of friars who know how to preach the Cross. A similar command sent to the Prior of the Friars preachers. 01. Roll, 36 H. 3.

William de Stone, Warden of this convent, by indenture dated Sunday after the feast of S. Anne the Virgin, 48 Edw. III. (1374), conveyed to John Brown, Alderman (or Mayor) of Staunford, John de Panetrie, William de Styandeby, Richard (10 Ardern, John de Spycer, John de Wakerlee, Williamde Makeseye, Simon Cokerel, John de Boresworth, Robert Prat, Waterum de Makeseye, William son of Henry, John de Maydenhieth, Henry dePaynbregge, and John de Bonde, with the assent of the whole community of the said town, their moiety of a spring at Stacye’s mill which then supplied both their convent and also the town conduit at Eastgate, in exchange for a whole spring called Estwellesheued, situate in Emblyn’s close, just opposite to them as being more convenient.alfi

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1299

* written. In witness whereof, I have put to my seal. Given at 4 Burg, on Easter eve, 1300. In presence of the lord abbat, the ma4 sters Thomasde Freston, & Geossry dc Makeseye, John de Undele, 4 Robert de Thorpe, Bernard de Castre, & Richard the clerc’ Besides those persons here named, Sir Hugh Wake & Sir Robert de Bavent (tho’ their names are omitted above) were present at sealing of the said letter of submission. The said master Hugh being thus tied down & obliged to performance of every article, the abbat then decreed, I. That he should keep up all the rights & liberties of the house. II. That all the income, whether revenues belonging to the house, or offerings given to it, should be divided into three parrs. One for a chantry priest to celebrate in the chapel, & do all other priestly offices necessary for the sick & poor strangers; & to buy lights, vestments, & other ornaments. Which office of the chantry priest the abbat enjoyned the said master Hugh to perform himself. Another

a Ex ejufdcm codicis MS. supracitati folio 51.

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Geoffrey De Makeseye
1299
Stanford
299 ing perhaps the foresaid Hugh would amend his behavior, restored 27-E. him to his former post. At what time the abbat appointed some of
his own officers to re-deliver the books, jewels, & other effects belonging to that hospital (which, to prevent embezzlement, he had formerly seised into his own hands) to the foresaid Mr. Hugh, who thereupon gave this acquittance for the fame. b’ To all the sons of
* holy mother church, who shall see or hear these letters, Hugh de « Clistcby master of the hospital of St. Thomas the martyr near Staun
* ford bridge, eternal health in the Lord. Your universality shall tin
* derstand that I have received from the religious man lord William
* by divine permission abbat of Buxg, my lord, by the hands of master ‘Geoffry de Makeseye the cierc, all my books, jewels, &alltheuten’sils, brasen & wooden, & other small matters in the chamber & my
* chests being, and also in the hall, cellar, kitchen, & bake house, in 1 custody of the officers of the said lord abbat left, & by them found ‘in the apartments aforesaid in the hospital aforesaid; & them alf
* acknowledge to be to me fully restored: the forenamed lord abbat
‘& other his officers the deputed keepers of these things, from all • ‘action for the fame hereafter to be made on the occasion aforesaid,
* by tenor of the presents declaring by the presents quit. In witness « whereof to the presents my seal is appendent. And for greater evi
a Ex codicis MS. in Bib. Cotton, sub b id. sol. 30. imagine Vdp. E. XXII. sol. 41.
9 K … ‘dence
* dencc I have procured the seal of the deanery of the Nassc of Burg
* to be put to the presents. Given at Staunford the Tuesday next
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XUtCOlllta.— Preceptum fuit Vicecomiti *Willelmum Berthelmeu quod
esset coram Rege in Crastino Sancti Johannis Baptiste vbicumque &c ad
satisfaciendum Regi de redempcione sua occasione cuiusdam transgres-
sionis quam idem Willelmus Galfrido de Makeseye vi et armis fecerat
prout per quamdam iuratam &c inde inter eos &c conuictum &c. Et

* William Berthelmeu that the sheriff was XUtCOlllta.-
it would be before the king on the morrow of St John the Baptist wherever and C to
to satisfy the king of his ransom the occasion of some of trespasses
tion than by force of arms he had done the same William Geoffrey of Makeseye
between them through a kind of jury, & c, & c, according as the convicted, & c. The

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Clergyman of Ely, Norwich, England
Johannes de Makeseye
translasted
de Term. Triii., 1297
the Term. Ministers., 1297de Term. Triii., 1297
the Term. Ministers., 1297
 Preceptum fuit Vicecomiti *Willelmum Berthelmeu quod
esset coram Rege in Crastino Sancti Johannis Baptiste vbicumque &c ad
satisfaciendum Regi de redempcione sua occasione cuiusdam transgres-
sionis quam idem Willelmus Galfrido de Makeseye vi et armis fecerat
prout per quamdam iuratam &c inde inter eos &c conuictum &c. Et
Sheriff was * that William Berthelmeu
it would be before the king on the morrow of St John the Baptist wherever and C to
to satisfy the king of his ransom the occasion of some of trespasses
tion than by force of arms he had done the same William Geoffrey of Makeseye
between them through a kind of jury, & c, & c, according as the convicted, & c. The
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1370
England
SUffOlCta. – Alan offered himself on the fourth day of the Goldingham the direction of William de Gyselingham a plea of ​​trespass. He did not come. And the Sheriff was ordered to distrain him. And the sheriff sent word that it is by means of the aforesaid William mainprised of the Bedynesfeld John atte the results of Green, Richard Aylberth ‘, Richard Frere and William xW. Godard of the same. And the issues are forty pence. So they are in love. ^ Lfi For this reason, it was ordered that the Sheriff as previously to distrain him by all his lands, & c. And the fact that the issues of, & c. And that he have his body before the king wherever or within fifteen days from the day of Saint Michael, & c.
offered himself on the fourth day of the Muselee iROrbantptOnta.-Ancelinus the verses of the Irtelingburgh Nicholas and John the brother of Ralph, Richard Satheus, Richard son of Geoffrey, Robert son of Thomas le Feure, William son of Richard Fretelof, Richard his brother, and William son of Juliana of Higham of a plea of ​​trespass. And they do not come. And just as the number of times it was ordered that the Sheriff to arrest them. And the sheriff sent word that Geoffrey the African coast, William of Higham, John Higham and John of Makeseye of an undertaking to Willelmi’a. Finally, the son of Gillian. So they are in love. And the other notified
* Thcse words are interlined in the origin.il.
Viscount & c, nor any other part that they are not found in the open, & c. And so as often is ordered to arrest them to be before the king wherever or within fifteen days from the day of Saint Michael, & c.
IberefOrfcta.-is evident by the transcript of the foot of one of the sheriff was ordered that when the end is in the court of the lord Henry, the King, the King, the father of king that now is, in the presence of the same Roger of Turkeby and his fellows, justices of the Bench of King Henry the thirty and seventh year of the reign of his place between Richard as prior of the new plaintiff, and Richard Syfrewast the sods, which has caused to come before him, O King, that the same Richard ascertained that he was of the aforesaid Prior and hi
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1297
with translation
IRorbaiUptOUia.— Ancelinus de Muselee optulit se iiij die uersus 
Nicholaum et Johannem fratres Radulphi de Irtelingburgh, Ricardum 
Satheus, Ricardum filium Galfridi, Robertum filium Thome le Feure, 
Willelmum filium Ricardi Fretelof, Ricardum fratrem eius et Willelmum 
filium Juliane de Hecham de placito transgressionis. Et ipsi non 
veniunt. Et sicut pluries preceptum est Vicecomiti quod caperet eos. 
Et Vicecomes mandauit quod Galfridus paraunt, Willelmus de Hecham, 
Johannes de Hecham et Johannes de Makeseye manuceperunt Willel- 
mum filium Juliane. Ideo ipsi in misericordia. Et de aliis mandauit
IRorbaiUptOUia.- Ancelinus himself on the fourth day of Muselee lines
Of the Irtelingburgh Nicholas and John the brother of Ralph, Richard
Satheus, Richard son of Geoffrey, Robert son of Thomas le Feure,
William son of Richard Fretelof, Richard and William his brother,
a plea of ​​trespass son of Juliana of Higham. And they do not
come. And just as the number of times it was ordered that the Sheriff to arrest them.
And the sheriff sent word that Geoffrey the African coast, William of Higham,
John Higham and John William bailed out Makeseye
Finally, the son of Gillian. So they are in love. And the other notified
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1297
XUtCOlllta.— Preceptum fuit Vicecomiti *Willelmum Berthelmeu quod 
esset coram Rege in Crastino Sancti Johannis Baptiste vbicumque &c ad 
satisfaciendum Regi de redempcione sua occasione cuiusdam transgres- 
sionis quam idem Willelmus Galfrido de Makeseye vi et armis fecerat 
prout per quamdam iuratam &c inde inter eos &c conuictum &c. Et 
* William Berthelmeu that the sheriff was XUtCOlllta.-
it would be before the king on the morrow of St John the Baptist wherever and C to
to satisfy the king of his ransom the occasion of some of trespasses
tion than by force of arms he had done the same William Geoffrey of Makeseye
between them through a kind of jury, & c, & c, according as the convicted, & c. The
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1200’s/13th century
Roger son of John de Lawnye to the abbot and convent of Vaudey.
Property: a bovate in Creeton he holds of the abbot and convent for his suit of court and a pound of pepper and about which he has been disputing. He now yields up the bovate to them absolutely.
Witnesses: Hugh Erlyn and Hugh de Makeseye of Edenham, Hugh Heryng and Roger le Ky of Scotilthorpe, William son of John of and William de Stafford of Swynsted.
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1288
Kesteven, England
Willelmi de Coleuile de Makeseye
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